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Fig. 2 | BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Fig. 2

From: Maternal intake of dietary virgin coconut oil modifies essential fatty acids and causes low body weight and spiky fur in mice

Fig. 2

Comparison and phenotype of weight changes of dietary groups. a: We compared the weight between pups of the three groups at 3 and 6 weeks of age. Both OO- and CO- fed pups showed delay in growth and development compared to the STD fed pups at 3 weeks of age. Pups of control groups were significantly (P < 0.05) (One-way ANOVA) higher in weight over those fed with virgin coconut oil. Although weight of pups fed with virgin olive oil was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those fed with STD at 6 weeks of age, pups fed with virgin olive oil had developed normally at late weaning stage of growth, due to insignificant (P > 0.05) differences in (One way ANOVA) weight gained corresponding to STD. Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test shows that pups fed with virgin coconut oil were significantly (P < 0.05) delayed in growth to the virgin olive oil control and STD at 6 weeks of age. Single asterisk (*) represent significant differences between groups at 3-weeks of age. Double asterisk (**) represent significant differences between groups at 6-weeks of age. Values represent means, error bars are standard deviation. b: A typical CD1 mouse on normal diet. c: A typical CD1 mouse on virgin olive oil diet. d: A typical CD1 mouse on virgin coconut oil diet which exhibits the “spiky fur” coat phenotype and evidently skinnier than other littermates (n = 3 out of a total of 3 litters, N = 33). e & f: A typical mouse on virgin coconut oil diet which exhibits the “spiky fur” coat phenotype on its dorsal aspect

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