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  • Poster presentation
  • Open Access

P02.67. An alternative for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, an observational case series

  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 3 and
  • 3
BMC Complementary and Alternative MedicineThe official journal of the International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR)201212 (Suppl 1) :P123

https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-12-S1-P123

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  • Mental Health Status
  • Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patient
  • SPECT Scan

Purpose

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has an elusive diagnosis and etiology. Treatment focuses on alleviation of symptoms and improving a patient’s quality of life. The primary objective was to observe and record changes in a subject’s health related quality of life (HRQoL), using the SF 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36), before and six months after a National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association (NUCCA) atlas correction. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to observe changes in a subject's sleep quality.

Methods

Nineteen subjects diagnosed as having CFS according to the 1994 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) diagnostic criteria were studied. Patients who were fatigued six (6) or more months and who met four (4) or more diagnostic criteria were psychiatrically evaluated, and then underwent lab testing and SPECT imaging. Data collection and study administration were conducted using a practice-based research-based protocol. Patients were monitored for a period of six months to insure Atlas alignment was maintained and then retested.

Results

SF-36 results at the end of the study, by a paired t-test of SF-36 data (n=19) revealed a significant increase in the General Health component, from 30.3 pre to 60.9 post (p<0.03), and in the Mental Health component, from 68.6 to 74.7 (p<0.02). The overall PSQI score significantly decreased from 12.1 to 6.1 (p<0.05). SPECT scans and lab testing were inconclusive.

Conclusion

If correction of atlas misalignment in clinically diagnosed CFS patients is the single variable that appears responsible for self-reported improvement of functional and mental health status, then further study is warranted to determine the utility of this intervention in patient care. The study was limited by the lack of a control group and that care was provided by only one practitioner.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Upper Cervical Research Association, Bellingham, USA
(2)
National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association, Monroe, USA
(3)
Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, Barrington, USA

Copyright

© Woodfield et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2012

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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